WRITING ON THE ETHER: While You Were Bashing Amazon

Porter Anderson, PorterAnderson.com, Writingon the Ether, Ether for Authors, London on the Ether, Jane Friedman, Ed Nawotka, Philip Jones, Publishing Perspectives, The Bookseller, books, ebooks, author, agent, Amazon, publishing, The FutureBook

Table of Contents

  1. Seattle Hands $110,000 to Five Authors
  2. Dr. Walniuk Is in the House
  3. The “Devil” Is in the Details

Seattle Hands $110,000 to Five Authors

My feet have started to touch the ground again. I was pretty floaty there for a while.

Sitting down?.

Porter Anderson, PorterAnderson.com, Writingon the Ether, Ether for Authors, London on the Ether, Jane Friedman, Ed Nawotka, Philip Jones, Publishing Perspectives, The Bookseller, books, ebooks, author, agent, Amazon, publishing, The FutureBook

Rysa Walker

She got a publishing contract and a $50,000 advance for her debut YA self-published novel.

The novel for which author Rysa Walker has just received that advance started life as the self-published Time’s Twisted Arrow.

When Amazon Publishing releases it on October 22, it will be titled Timebound.

Porter Anderson, PorterAnderson.com, Writingon the Ether, Ether for Authors, London on the Ether, Jane Friedman, Ed Nawotka, Philip Jones, Publishing Perspectives, The Bookseller, books, ebooks, author, agent, Amazon, publishing, The FutureBookAnd will have been re-edited and prepared with its new cover as a fully vested catalog offering from the Skyscape imprint, part of Amazon Children’s Publishing.

And it’s her first.

As long as you’re sitting there weeping, I’ll just mention Walker’s four co-finalists in the Amazon Breakthrough Novel Award competition. Why let those Kleenexes go to waste?

Porter Anderson, PorterAnderson.com, Writingon the Ether, Ether for Authors, London on the Ether, Jane Friedman, Ed Nawotka, Philip Jones, Publishing Perspectives, The Bookseller, books, ebooks, author, agent, Amazon, publishing, The FutureBookThese four authors now are first prize winners. They each have been given a contract with a  $15,000 advance. They are:

Ken Moraff in Ithaca, New York, whose winning book is It Happened in Wisconsin, is the general fiction category winner, about a Depression-era baseball team and the dynamics of its players relationships.

Porter Anderson, PorterAnderson.com, Writingon the Ether, Ether for Authors, London on the Ether, Jane Friedman, Ed Nawotka, Philip Jones, Publishing Perspectives, The Bookseller, books, ebooks, author, agent, Amazon, publishing, The FutureBookJo Chumas, a journalist in Barcelona. Her book, The Hidden, is the winner in the mystery and thriller category. Set in the Egyptian Sinai in the 1940s, it combines “brutal murder,” revolution and old diary writings.Chumas book will be published in October on the Thomas & Mercer imprint.

(Book PR copy always says “brutally murdered.” No one is ever just murdered. They’re “brutally murdered.” Never “gently murdered,” “softly murdered,” “mildly murdered,” “thoughtfully murdered.” That’s because murder by any means is brutal. Just “murdered” is all you need. The “brutality” is hype.)

Porter Anderson, PorterAnderson.com, Writingon the Ether, Ether for Authors, London on the Ether, Jane Friedman, Ed Nawotka, Philip Jones, Publishing Perspectives, The Bookseller, books, ebooks, author, agent, Amazon, publishing, The FutureBookEvelyn Pryce, whose winning book, A Man Beyond Reproach, is also a debut effort. This one is the romance-category winner, set in 1830s London and a bordello that seems to cater to noblemen who might become Shirtless Men Kissing Beautiful Women. this one will be out in October on the Montlake Romance imprint.

J. Lincoln Fenn “began her career in horror,” her bio says. This is true of so many of us, isn’t it?

Porter Anderson, PorterAnderson.com, Writingon the Ether, Ether for Authors, London on the Ether, Jane Friedman, Ed Nawotka, Philip Jones, Publishing Perspectives, The Bookseller, books, ebooks, author, agent, Amazon, publishing, The FutureBookNo, seriously, her book, Poe—winner in the sci-fi, fantasy, and horror category of the competition—is set on Halloween and features a Rasputin zombie-novelist who writes obits for a living. I hope it quotes a raven, too. With a title like Poe, this one simply has to come out on the 47North imprint.

I’d be interested in hearing of other publishers in the industry! the industry! that have cultivated new fiction so richly and in such a readership-involving way as Amazon Publishing’s global voting stage that asks readers, themselves, to gauge the material.

And once you’ve pulled yourself together, we’re going to spend some time here with the grand-prize winner, Rysa Walker, whose experience and approach reflect the way Amazon’s program is not only producing work but also nurturing it.

For her part, Walker—that first name is pronounced “RYE-sa”—tells me in a phone interview from her home in Cary, North Carolina, “I’ve actually made a lot of friends in the indie community. I spent the last year trying to market what was then Time’s Twisted Arrow,” her winning manuscript which she’d published, herself.

 

Self-publication wasn’t a requirement of the competition, nor was it a problem. The rules of the Breakthrough Novel Award program prohibit entering material that has been under a publishing contract currently or previously. But as long as the rights have never left the author, an entry is valid. The entry period is normally in mid- to late-January. Up to 10,000 people can make one entry each. The competition, and the voting on the winners, is international and goes through several stages of selection and elimination. Walker remembers her self-published effort not quite languishing but not taking off, either. “I got a lot of good reviews. I won’t even tell you it was selling okay. It was tolerable, a few sales a week. For an indie author, that being my first book, and knowing it was part of a series, that was hopeful.”


Now, of course, what will publish as Timebound in October looks much more than merely hopeful. And it’s the first in a three-volume series, Walker says.

I never thought I’d get past the point of the free Publishers Weekly review [at the semi-finalist stage]. That was really my goal. I was hoping not to have to pay for an indie review.

Porter Anderson, PorterAnderson.com, Writingon the Ether, Ether for Authors, London on the Ether, Jane Friedman, Ed Nawotka, Philip Jones, Publishing Perspectives, The Bookseller, books, ebooks, author, agent, Amazon, publishing, The FutureBookWalker makes a point familiar to many self-publishing authors: despite the fact that authors must pay their way into both Kirkus’ and Publishers Weekly’s programs for self-published writers, the resulting reviews will label the work as independent.

Porter Anderson, PorterAnderson.com, Writingon the Ether, Ether for Authors, London on the Ether, Jane Friedman, Ed Nawotka, Philip Jones, Publishing Perspectives, The Bookseller, books, ebooks, author, agent, Amazon, publishing, The FutureBookKirkus Indie offers a review at rates of $425 for a standard review and $575 for an express review.

Publishers Weekly offers the possibility of a review (PW makes the choice) with a PW Select registration for a listing at $149 for self-published books.

Walker:

I was reviewed at Kirkus, and it was a very positive review. But I had to pay for it and it was still “Kirkus Indie.” Some people look at that, and they dismiss it, even though you can pay that money and get a bad review. I know plenty of people who have done that. But people still see this as a “paid review” and therefore not valid.

The stigma [about self-publishing] is not gone yet. I read an article yesterday that ripped into indies, saying that 95 percent of what’s out there is bad and it’s degrading the publishing industry because people don’t know where to find a good book. And there is some truth to that, but I’ve read some pretty bad traditionally published books, too. Maybe not as many grammatical errors, but there are other issues, too.

Porter Anderson, PorterAnderson.com, Writingon the Ether, Ether for Authors, London on the Ether, Jane Friedman, Ed Nawotka, Philip Jones, Publishing Perspectives, The Bookseller, books, ebooks, author, agent, Amazon, publishing, The FutureBook

Polly Courtney

In an interesting parallel, British author Polly Courtney’s new Q&A at the Guardian, ‘Now I’m back to self-publishing, I’ve regained control’, has some pointed comments about her experience in working on a contract with HarperCollins.

Her new, self-published book, Feral Youth—involving the 2011 London riots—is scheduled for an August 1 availability in the States.

Porter Anderson, PorterAnderson.com, Writingon the Ether, Ether for Authors, London on the Ether, Jane Friedman, Ed Nawotka, Philip Jones, Publishing Perspectives, The Bookseller, books, ebooks, author, agent, Amazon, publishing, The FutureBookCourtney writes:

When I signed with HarperCollins, I thought “Great! This is the golden ticket I’ve been waiting for!” I thought it would be a great collaboration between me and the publisher, given my success self-publishing my first two novels. The reality was a big disappointment. The publisher seemed intent on pushing my books into pre-existing moulds (“misery lit”, “chick lit”) that didn’t reflect the contents.

“Brand Polly Courtney” was increasingly muddled, leading to confusion for readers. It turned out that my editor hadn’t actually read my first two books. There was no marketing budget, which meant that it was up to me to promote each book. This wasn’t a problem per se, but my job was made hard by the frivolous book covers and titles assigned to them. I actually felt ashamed of the product. Now I’m back to self-publishing, I’ve regained control.

 

If anything, Walker seems to be just as happily making the trip the other direction, from self-published writer to an Amazon Publishing (traditional) author. She’s impressed at the agility of the company, she says. By the time the Breakthrough competition’s five finalists were chosen, “they were in high gear,” she says, creating cover art, putting her book through its first developmental edit (which she liked), so that the quintet of winners will all publish in a smart time-frame, on October 22, “while the buzz is still there.” And it’s a moment of new buzz for Amazon Publishing, as well.

Porter Anderson, PorterAnderson.com, Writingon the Ether, Ether for Authors, London on the Ether, Jane Friedman, Ed Nawotka, Philip Jones, Publishing Perspectives, The Bookseller, books, ebooks, author, agent, Amazon, publishing, The FutureBook

Oliver Pötzsch

As covered by Digital Book World’s Jeremy Greenfield at Forbes, the company has found a million-copy seller in the German author Oliver Pötzsch, translating the Hangman’s Daughter series on the AmazonCrossing imprint. In Amazon Publishing Has First Million-Copy Hit; Will Authors, Agents Take Notice? Porter Anderson, PorterAnderson.com, Writingon the Ether, Ether for Authors, London on the Ether, Jane Friedman, Ed Nawotka, Philip Jones, Publishing Perspectives, The Bookseller, books, ebooks, author, agent, Amazon, publishing, The FutureBookGreenfield writes:

His Hangman’s Daughter series has sold over a million copies of three titles between print, ebook and audio-book sales…“One big question is how much of the sale came from Harcourt’s print edition?” said Mike Shatzkin, a publishing industry consultant and conference programmer for Digital Book World. “When there’s an Amazon-Harcourt partnership, the resistance should be much less.”

The Harcourt arrangement with Amazon places Amazon Publishing print editions in cooperating bookstores. Greenfield quotes Forrester’s James McQuivey, himself an Amazon Publishing author of Digital Disruption: Unleashing the Next Wave of Innovation:

I don’t think Barnes & Noble will be moved but indie bookstores might look to this and say, “We want to have the books that people want to read. You might want to take a moral stand but you might also want to sell books. So you could try putting some Amazon books in there and if they don’t sell, maybe you do a little victory dance and if they do sell, well, that’s money.

Meanwhile, there’s no shortage of victory dancing for the grand prize winner of Amazon Publishing’s Breakthrough Novel competition.

Back to Table of Contents

 

 

Dr. Walniuk Is in the House

 

One of my goals in writing this series of YA books has been to get younger readers interested in real history.

Porter Anderson, PorterAnderson.com, Writingon the Ether, Ether for Authors, London on the Ether, Jane Friedman, Ed Nawotka, Philip Jones, Publishing Perspectives, The Bookseller, books, ebooks, author, agent, Amazon, publishing, The FutureBookA longtime educator in history and government, Walker’s real name is Dr. Cheryl Walniuk. She teaches through the University of Maryland’s University College online program. Her CHRONOS Files site, the online home for her three-part series of books, includes information for educators in which she explains her interest in writing historical fiction. Somewhat like Courtney’s writings, Walker’s YA material is backed by an interest in youth culture. To her fellow teachers, she writes:

My own love of history began with the stacks of historical novels that I always found lying in dusty corners at my grandmother’s house. By the time I was in graduate school, I realized that much of the “history” I’d gotten from those books was rather suspect, but I’m not sure if I would have ever become a professor of history and government if those books hadn’t gotten me interested enough that I wanted to dig deeper and learn more.

Walniuk’s blog section at CHRONOS Files includes a call for student submissions, with full instructions here. If you know a young person who might enjoy learning how to study history through through the eyes of a supposed time-traveling observer, check it out and see if it’s something you’d like to guide them toward.


Walniuk/Walker is hoping that her fictional formulation of a so-called CHRONOS time-traveling designer gene (Chrono-Historical Research Organization and Natural Observation Society) will inspire young people to start “using primary sources in a creative writing assignment.” She’s hoping to promote students’ own writings in alignment with the Library of Congress’ Common Core initiative.

 

In teaching at the university level, Walniuk says, “we get so many students who haven’t a clue what a primary source is, let alone how you might find it, how you might use it.” Her own work as Rysa Walker is a way of modeling the right approach. And if you’ve assumed that Amazon’s big prize has gone to some time-tunneling ditty about happy moments in the Belle Époque, think again.

Back to Table of Contents

 

The “Devil” Is in the Details

Porter Anderson, PorterAnderson.com, Writingon the Ether, Ether for Authors, London on the Ether, Jane Friedman, Ed Nawotka, Philip Jones, Publishing Perspectives, The Bookseller, books, ebooks, author, agent, Amazon, publishing, The FutureBookTimebound’s historical destination is a well-documented Sweeney Todd-like tale. Another book, Erik Larson’s The Devil in the White City: A Saga of Magic and Murder at the Fair that Changed America, is a 2004 narrative nonfiction treatment from Vintage of the same material, optioned by Leonardo DiCaprio for a possible film treatment.

H.H. Holmes, sometimes described as the first modern US serial killer, used the 1893 World’s Fair in Chicago as the rationale for what Walker describes as a “women’s hotel.”  She tells me:

Nobody really knows how many people he killed. He didn’t even know because he had a lime pit in the basement of his hotel, he’d slide the bodies down there. And so many women were coming in to Chicago for the World’s Fair, either as visitors or, in a lot of cases, for work. He set it up [his “castle,” as it’s described in some accounts] as a hotel catering to women. And a lot of women disappeared.

Porter Anderson, PorterAnderson.com, Writingon the Ether, Ether for Authors, London on the Ether, Jane Friedman, Ed Nawotka, Philip Jones, Publishing Perspectives, The Bookseller, books, ebooks, author, agent, Amazon, publishing, The FutureBook

H.H. Holmes in an 1895 mug shot | Wikipedia.com

Paralleling her experience of the stigma attached to self-published work, Walker says that her earlier writings carry their own kind of impediment.

“I have written some academic work, but I found out that was more of a deficit.” To mention academic writing, she says, makes people think “four-thousand footnotes and probably not a very good plot.”

Nevertheless, Walker’s original preparation in Time’s Twisted Arrow, the self-published predecessor to Timebound, she concedes, wasn’t what she’d like it to have been.

It had a number of beta readers. I did not use a professional editor because, to be honest, I couldn’t find one I could afford. I’ve done some editing on my own. And although you should never, ever edit your own work, I did. And there are a few typos in the Time’s Twisted Arrow version to prove it, because your eye just ends to gloss over the error.

But I also had beta readers including two young-adult authors. And a couple of friends whose opinions I really respected. One of them told me, “This is good. If you’re not getting any feedback from agents, just get it out there.”

Porter Anderson, PorterAnderson.com, Writingon the Ether, Ether for Authors, London on the Ether, Jane Friedman, Ed Nawotka, Philip Jones, Publishing Perspectives, The Bookseller, books, ebooks, author, agent, Amazon, publishing, The FutureBookWalker says she likes the idea of the “professional betas” discussed in Tuesday’s Ether for Authors at Publishing Perspectives, “if they’ll actually catch continuity errors” and other such editorial details, as well as being pre-publication audience-reaction predictors.

One of Walker’s children, a son, was a primary reader for her.

He zips through YA novels like potato chips. And he was able to spot a lot of things for me. It helped when they were sending me covers. One had curlicue fonts. All the boys in the family were like, “No, I would not pick up that book because somebody might see me looking at it.”….Having that input from the group you’re targeting is invaluable.

Once her book had gone into competition for the Breakthrough Award and was ready for customer votes in the final stage of the contest, the facts that she’d been in touch with groups of young readers and that she had her book self-published, she says, were advantages.

That last stage is a matter of whether you can get out the vote. There were several hundred readers out there, maybe more than that, who had read the book, liked the book [as Time’s Twisted Arrow]. I was able to contact them and say, “Spread the word.”

 

About three weeks ago, she took down the original Time’s Twisted Arrow to be sure that readers don’t mistake Timebound in October for the second book in the series.

On the wider scale, and in answer to the question in Greenfield’s headline, of course authors and agents will certainly notice not only the million-selling coup of Oliver Pötzsch’s series but also the arrival of the Walker Timebound and four other handsomely awarded contracts moving to the market in October.


While its challenges are contemporary, Amazon Publishing may have had no more difficulty finding traction in the market in its first couple of years than many of the well-established houses initially experienced decades ago. The “breakthroughs” celebrated over the weekend may not lie only in those contracts for writers.

And however many in Old Publishing may still decry Amazon Publishing as an incursion, many entrepreneurial authors recognize it as a new-work-nourishing player indigenous to an unprecedented global marketplace.

On the personal level, Walker says that her big win ends up validating friends and family who have believed in her work as much as it does her own effort.

My sister who went to the award ceremony with me [last Saturday at Seattle’s Olympic Sculpture Park] has had very high hopes for the book. She kept saying, “It’s really, really good.” And I kept saying, “But, Donna, wouldn’t you tell me that even if you didn’t think it was really good?” She said, “Yes, I would. But it’s really good.” And I said, “Okay, sorry, but you don’t have much credibility on that point.”

And now? She’s saying, “Yes I do have credibility on that point now. I’ve been validated by this award, too.”

Porter Anderson, PorterAnderson.com, Writingon the Ether, Ether for Authors, London on the Ether, Jane Friedman, Ed Nawotka, Philip Jones, Publishing Perspectives, The Bookseller, books, ebooks, author, agent, Amazon, publishing, The FutureBook

Rysa Walker at the Amazon Breakthrough Novel Award ceremony in Seattle, June 15, 2013.

Back to Table of Contents

 

 


Main image: iStockphoto – NickP37

Posted in Writing on the Ether and tagged , .

Porter Anderson / @Porter_Anderson

Porter Anderson (@Porter_Anderson) is a journalist and consultant in publishing. He's The Bookseller's (London) Associate Editor in charge of The FutureBook. He's a featured writer with Thought Catalog (New York), which carries his reports, commentary, and frequent Music for Writers interviews with composers and musicians. And he's a regular contributor of "Provocations in Publishing" with Writer Unboxed. Through his consultancy, Porter Anderson Media, Porter covers, programs, and speaks at publishing conferences and other events in Europe and the US, and works with various players in publishing, such as Library Journal's SELF-e, Frankfurt Book Fair's Business Club, and authors. You can follow his editorial output at Porter Anderson Media, and via this RSS link.

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35 Comments on "WRITING ON THE ETHER: While You Were Bashing Amazon"

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Stacey Laatsch

Congratulations, Rysa. Oh, how exciting it is to be an author-entrepreneur right now.

Porter Anderson

@staceylaatsch:disqus

That seems to be the sentiment shared by many, Stacey, thanks for reading and dropping a line!
-p.
On Twitter, @Porter_Anderson

Peter Turner

I hate to jump into the ring on this one, but Amazon did not “hand out” anything, nor are they prizes, this money is an advance against royalties, no?

Porter Anderson

Correct, these are advances, four of $15,000 each and one of $50,000. They are termed the Amazon Breakthrough Novel Award — and the recipients do actually win them in several rounds of initial selection and then public/consumer voting.

Porter Anderson

Funny that jump into the ring, by the way. 🙂 Just when so many are on the ropes. 🙂

JosephRatliff
This comment is aimed at the “paying for Kirkus reviews,” and even worse, “paying for a CHANCE to be reviewed by PW” type of approach to getting your book reviewed. I think writers need to stop doing that. Get some copies of your book, and get it genuinely reviewed by handing it to people. Build a platform, speak (prepare a talk about your book), do the work, market your writing. Sorry for the “tone” of that comment Porter, but it just irks me how much some institutions want to reach into writer’s pockets for services that are providing less and… Read more »
Victoria_Noe
Amen. I’ll buy a Powerball ticket before I pay for a chance at a review. I’m pretty tight about my marketing money. It’s not that I’m unwilling to gamble occasionally, but I even decline to enter my books in 99% of contests. Why? It’s not because of the entry fees, which are debatable, but mostly seem within reason. It’s because of the prizes. So many contests for self-published books (including Writers Digest) offer prizes that I’m not interested in: I don’t want to meet with a traditional publisher. I don’t want to have a free consultation with someone I’ve never… Read more »
Porter Anderson
@Victoria_Noe:disqus Hey, Viki, I think you make a good point here that I try to offer to authors who ask me about some of the venues for paid reviews (or consideration for possible review). You do have to think of whether you want review material to run in venues that are “facing in” to the industry (such as PW and Kirkus) or out to the public. Now both Publishers Weekly and Kirkus reviews may be known by some of our savvier readers — you could always do a hell of a lot worse. But especially when, as Rysa Walker points… Read more »
Victoria_Noe

That’s why I liked Amazon’s prizes too: they weren’t “a chance” or “an hour with”. They were the real deal package that so many people want. Props to them.
Viki

Porter Anderson

Exactly, couldn’t agree more.

Porter Anderson
@JosephRatliff:disqus Hey, Joseph, thanks for the input! I know what your’e saying here, and I’m sure many will agree with you. The point of having “people” review your book, though — as in your idea of giving the book to good folks for review — has to do (much as I’m saying in my comment to Viki) with what you want to get out of the review. Reviews by readers hold increasing status in the market, especially thanks to Otis and Elizabeth’s Goodreads — now an Amazon property, which is very promising. There is every reason to respect and support… Read more »
Rysa Walker
Thanks, Joseph! Despite the dent that the Kirkus Review made in my meager marketing budget, I still think it was useful. It is, admittedly, much less relevant after winning the ABNA, but the Kirkus Review helped gain attention from a number of readers, especially teachers and librarians, based on conversations I’ve had with readers over the past six months. It made them more willing to take a chance on a new author. Getting attention from teachers can be very important for those aiming at the young adult market, and the fact that Kirkus, even Kirkus Indie, had good things to… Read more »
Porter Anderson

@rysawalker:disqus

This is great input, Rysa, thank you.

I’m really glad to read you saying that despite the segregation of “Kirkus Indie,” the review was worth your having, especially in the educational space (which makes a lot of sense). Really informative addendum.

Thanks again for the good interview, great talking with you!
-P.
On Twitter @Porter_Anderson

Anne R. Allen
Every author I know who’s been published by an Amazon imprint has been amazingly happy with the process (authors love to kvetch, so this is rather miraculous.) The Zon even sends flowers on launch day. 🙂 But most writers still sticking with the trads echo Polly Courney’s experience “my editor hadn’t actually read my first two books. There was no marketing budget, which meant that it was up to me to promote each book. This wasn’t a problem per se, but my job was made hard by the frivolous book covers and titles assigned to them. I actually felt ashamed… Read more »
Porter Anderson
@annerallen:disqus Flowers on launch day. I mean really. I was even impressed that they brought in everybody for an awards ceremony in the park in Seattle, how cool is that? You’re right about the all-too-representative nature of Polly Courtney’s experience, of course. It takes some guts to be so clear about it, too. While I do think there are good experiences to be had in traditional publishing, they’re not always the rule and some authors don’t have the reslience that Polly Courtney has. Her strong following and secure understanding of what she wants to do speak volumes in terms of… Read more »
Rysa Walker

I left Seattle feeling that my book was in excellent hands. Based on my conversation with the other winners, they feel the same. The editors tracked down Jeff Bezos to get him to sign the display covers used at the ceremony — and above his signature were the words “Authors rule.” So far, that’s been my experience every step of the way with my teams at Skyscape — and I didn’t even know about flowers on launch day 🙂

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[…] advances at all in most cases.  Turns out I may have spoken out of turn.  Jane Friedman’s Writing on the Ether blog has a story about author Rysa Walker receiving a $50,000 advance for her self-published title […]

Lara Schiffbauer

Yay for all the winners! It’s heartening to see people achieve their dreams. I know Amazon isn’t perfect, but they have given quite a bit of opportunity to authors. I’m appreciative.

Porter Anderson

@laraschiffbauer:disqus

I know many authors who agree with you, Lara — despite some missteps, Amazon has been a game-changer for entrepreneurial authors. Great to see new content cultivated in a way that involves the readership, too.

Thanks for reading and dropping a note!

-p.
On Twitter, @Porter_Anderson

Shirley Showalter

Hurrah for new ways for new writers to find their readers and be recognized and supported. I don’t suppose Amazon has an award for first-time memoir writers also?

I continue to appreciate the ways in which you present developments in the “industry,” Porter. Thanks for being my teacher and for not having knee-jerk reactions to change.

Porter Anderson
@shirleyhs:disqus Hey, Shirley, So great of you to read the Ether and to drop such a great note! You know, I’m unsure about competitions for memoir, but I know the best person to ask. Jump onto Twitter and look for my friend and colleague @KathyPooler — she’s terrific. Very well connected in the memoir world and I’m sure has her finger on the contests out there (of which I think there are many for memoir). Here’s Kathy’s site: http://krpooler.com/blog/ Lovely of you to mention the no-knee-jerk factor. That’s the name of the game these days, just trying to hold real… Read more »
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[…] On the Ether at JaneFriedman.com, Porter Anderson looks at Amazon Publishing's latest strides — $110,000 in author awards and a new million-copy seller.  […]

Karla Akins

Congratulations, Rysa! Wow oh wow oh wow. Impressive.

Porter Anderson

@KarlaAkins:disqus

Great news, isn’t it, Karla?
Thanks for reading.
-p.
On Twitter, @Porter_Anderson:disqus

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[…] “Writing on the Ether: While You Were Bashing Amazon” by Porter Anderson at Jane Friedman’s blog – June 20, 2013 […]

Jony

nice blog

Porter Anderson

@disqus_MTDPPlMoE2:disqus

Thanks, Jony, bests to you!

-p.

On Twitter, Porter Anderson

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[…] I could support PRH in a very noisy rollout of a new set of principles for its dealings with the artists of our profession. And, in fact, with such size, PRH is about to feel more keenly than ever, I’m hoping, the burden of its responsibility to authors and their cultivation, so handsomely handled by Amazon. […]

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[…] By Porter Ander­son | @Porter_Anderson Writ­ing on the Ether: Seat­tle Hands $110,000 to Five Authors […]

Ben Galley

Congratulations to Rysa!

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[…] “Her new, self-published book, Feral Youth — involving the 2011 London riots — is schedule… – Jane Friedman […]

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[…] “Her new, self-published book, Feral Youth — involving the 2011 London riots — is schedule… – Jane Friedman […]

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[…] Anderson on Jane Friedman Writing on the Ether: While You Were Bashing Amazon “Self-publication wasn’t a requirement of the competition, nor was it a problem. The rules […]

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[…] WRITING ON THE ETHER | While You Were Bash­ing Ama­zon | JANEFRIEDMAN.COM […]

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