WRITING ON THE ETHER: The Indies are Coming! to BEA

agent, author, books, digital, ebooks, Jane Friedman, Porter Anderson, publisher, publishing, Writing on the Ether, blog, blogging, journalism, Publishing Perspectives, Ether for Authors, Ed Nawotka, The Bookseller, FutureBook, Philip Jones, Digital Book 2013, IDPF, BEA 2013

Table of Contents

  1. BEA Booth 966: The Indies Are Coming!
  2. Amazon Kindle Worlds: The Fans Aren’t Fiction
  3. ‘Bootstrapped a Publishing Company’

BEA Booth 966: The Indies Are Coming!

Six entrepreneurial authors with more than 8.4 million books sold and counting: Is BEA ready for indie authors to claim their own territory?

agent, author, books, digital, ebooks, Jane Friedman, Porter Anderson, publisher, publishing, Writing on the Ether, blog, blogging, journalism, Publishing Perspectives, Ether for Authors, Ed Nawotka, The Bookseller, FutureBook, Philip Jones, Digital Book 2013, IDPF, BEA 2013

In this excerpt of the BEA exhibition hall floorplan, Booth 966 — Indie Bestsellers — is circled in yellow, upper right.

We’re about to find out.

Not that Big Six. (Thank you, Roz Morris.)

This big six, a sextet of the highest-rising stars of the entrepreneurial-author firmament. They’ve taken a booth together at BookExpo America.

They are Bella Andre, Stephanie Bond, Tina Folsom, Barbara Freethy, Hugh Howey, and CJ Lyons.

Lyons is the one asking, above, if BEA—once the boat show of US traditional publishing—is ready for the insurgency of her particular gang of six.

The authors have dubbed their installation the Indie Bestsellers booth, and are ready to stand their ground just yards from the mighty Ingram Content Group (#1056, #1057, #1157); across the aisle to their north from the LIbrary Journal (#757); three booths west of The New York Times (#857); backing up to NPR (#867); in easy sight of Kobo’s always gleaming setup (#967 and #1067); and sandwiched between Gotham Writers’ Workshop (#964) and FiloFax (#968)—so handy for those organizers and planners they need to sort out their next successes.

agent, author, books, digital, ebooks, Jane Friedman, Porter Anderson, publisher, publishing, Writing on the Ether, blog, blogging, journalism, Publishing Perspectives, Ether for Authors, Ed Nawotka, The Bookseller, FutureBook, Philip Jones, Digital Book 2013, IDPF, BEA 2013

C.J. Lyons
18 books on market
20 books by end of 2013
Selling indie since 2010
Total 1.5 million copies sold

Lyons, acting as a nominal ringleader for the group, was last seen on the Ether rallying members of the Alliance of Independent Authors at its book launch at London Book Fair.

At Earls Court, Lyons was focused and adamant, talking to Authoright’s packed AuthorLounge pavilion about the caution required in choosing author services for oneself. (ALLi’s Orna Ross and Ben Galley are expected to lead another launch of Choosing a Self-Publishing Service 2013 from BEA at 2:30 p.m. ET on May 31.)

This time, Lyons’ focal event is what’s known at the Jacob Javits Center each year as an “in-booth signing,” set for the group at 1 p.m. ET May 30 at Booth 966.

One of the most interesting features of this development, easily representative of the new rise of non-traditionally positioned authors, is that while they’re standing together as independents and self-publishers, they’re also tying directly into traditional patterns of marketing.

agent, author, books, digital, ebooks, Jane Friedman, Porter Anderson, publisher, publishing, Writing on the Ether, blog, blogging, journalism, Publishing Perspectives, Ether for Authors, Ed Nawotka, The Bookseller, FutureBook, Philip Jones, Digital Book 2013, IDPF, BEA 2013The perfectly logical custom among even the biggest publishers, as might be expected, has long been to try to have a new book, a new author—at the very least, a new announcement—ready in time for BEA, something shiny to wave over the heads of the buyers and sellers on the big floor. That’s not lost on these authors. Upstarts and hybrids that they are, they’re nevertheless rolling in with lots of shine.

Lyons, the medical-doctor-turned-hybrid-author of what she calls “thrillers with heart,” has new work to tout at BEA.

Right now the coolest is my first-ever YA Thriller, Broken, coming out in November from Sourcebooks. As a reader, I’ve always devoured YA—it’s so much more emotionally honest than a lot of adult fiction. As a pediatrician, I’ve seen first hand how inspired kids can be by the right story, but it took me years to find a story I felt worthy. Broken was inspired by my real-life work with Munchausen by Proxy[Syndrome] cases and the heroine was inspired by my own niece who I diagnosed with a heart condition when she was a few minutes old, so it’s a true book of my heart.

Lyons will sign ARCs of Broken on the 30th at 3 p.m. ET at the Sourcebooks booth nearby, #829.

agent, author, books, digital, ebooks, Jane Friedman, Porter Anderson, publisher, publishing, Writing on the Ether, blog, blogging, journalism, Publishing Perspectives, Ether for Authors, Ed Nawotka, The Bookseller, FutureBook, Philip Jones, Digital Book 2013, IDPF, BEA 2013

Tina Folsom
42 books on market
Selling indie since 2010
About 800,000 copies sold

For her part, paranormal romance writer Folsom is in traveling in Germany and the Czech Republic before flying to New York—with swag in tow, she tells me. She says her plans include not just Shirtless Men Kissing Beautiful Women but also Shirtless Men Kissing Other Shirtless Men.

I have a lot of new releases coming: a German one (Oliver’s Versuchung). Then Novella 4 of my Venice Vampyr Series (English). My next French translation (of Zane’s Redemption) will be out in July. And this summer I’ll be writing a male-male romance in my Scanguards vampires series. It will be about the gay vampire Thomas. After JR Ward released her Lover At Last (also a gay romance, in her BDB series), I feel finally brave enough to do a gay romance. My fans have been hounding me for the last year to finally write Thomas’s story.

agent, author, books, digital, ebooks, Jane Friedman, Porter Anderson, publisher, publishing, Writing on the Ether, blog, blogging, journalism, Publishing Perspectives, Ether for Authors, Ed Nawotka, The Bookseller, FutureBook, Philip Jones, Digital Book 2013, IDPF, BEA 2013

Bella Andre
19 books on market
Selling indie since 2010
Total 1.5 million copies sold

Romance writer Andre, with 19 titles on the market now, tells me she’s celebrating the advent of print in her career:

After signing the first-ever print-only deal with Harlequin MIRA for my New York Times best-selling Sullivan series, the first paperback (The Look of Love) will be released May 28th, just in time for BEA. The following 10 books will be released in back-to-back months, with a hardcover Christmas book added in October. I’m very excited about this print launch—Harlequin has extraordinary vision for the print side of my business.

agent, author, books, digital, ebooks, Jane Friedman, Porter Anderson, publisher, publishing, Writing on the Ether, blog, blogging, journalism, Publishing Perspectives, Ether for Authors, Ed Nawotka, The Bookseller, FutureBook, Philip Jones, Digital Book 2013, IDPF, BEA 2013

Stephanie Bond
30 books on market
Selling indie since 2011
Total 1 million copies sold

Bond—”author of books to make you love and laugh…and perhaps contemplate murder”—is based in Atlanta and is making her first pilgrimage to BEA this year.

My first original self-published mystery series, Two Guys Detective Agency, will be released through Amazon KDP Select on May 28. It’s been optioned for TV-series development by producer Barry Josephson (executive producer of the series Bones), and is being shopped to networks now.

agent, author, books, digital, ebooks, Jane Friedman, Porter Anderson, publisher, publishing, Writing on the Ether, blog, blogging, journalism, Publishing Perspectives, Ether for Authors, Ed Nawotka, The Bookseller, FutureBook, Philip Jones, Digital Book 2013, IDPF, BEA 2013

Barbara Freethy
23 books on market
Selling indie since 2011
Total 3 million copies sold

Women’s fiction and contemporary/suspence romance writer Barbara Freethy, like several of the others on the road prior to BEA, is jazzed to have had her Don’t Say a Word on the Times’ best-seller lists for the past four weeks.

I’m currently writing a new connected family series, The Callaways, about an Irish family born to “serve and protect” many as San Francisco firefighters. On a Night Like This (Callaways #1) and So This Is Love (Callaways #2) were released this year, and Falling for a Stranger (Callaways #3) goes on sale for pre-order on June 15th with release date of July 15.

While crediting Lyons and Folsom with the idea for the Indies Bestseller booth at BEA, Freethy readily sees beyond her own releases to the importance of a group presence of big-selling entrepreneurial authors at the trade show. She tells me in a note:

agent, author, books, digital, ebooks, Jane Friedman, Porter Anderson, publisher, publishing, Writing on the Ether, blog, blogging, journalism, Publishing Perspectives, Ether for Authors, Ed Nawotka, The Bookseller, FutureBook, Philip Jones, Digital Book 2013, IDPF, BEA 2013

Hugh Howey
14 books on market
Selling indie since 2011
Total 600,000+ copies sold

We know how to sell ebooks, and it’s important for Indie authors to have a presence at BEA. Indie authors are selling successfully along side every New York publisher. Indie titles are competing on the lists and often winning.

As it happens, Freethy is also featured in one of the biggest news developments of the week, Amazon Publishing’s announcement of its new Kindle Worlds fan-fiction initiative.

And Booth 966’s Hugh Howey is weighing in.

Back to Table of Contents

 

Amazon Kindle Worlds: The Fans Aren’t Fiction

 

Interested writers are encouraged to visit Kindle Worlds (www.amazon.com/kindleworlds) to learn more and get a head start on writing. In June, the Kindle Worlds store is expected to launch with over 50 commissioned works from authors such as #1 New York Times best-selling author Barbara Freethy, Bram Stoker Award-winner John Everson and RITA Award-winner Colleen Thompson. At that time, the Kindle Worlds self-service submission platform, where any writer can submit completed work, will also open.

agent, author, books, digital, ebooks, Jane Friedman, Porter Anderson, publisher, publishing, Writing on the Ether, blog, blogging, journalism, Publishing Perspectives, Ether for Authors, Ed Nawotka, The Bookseller, FutureBook, Philip Jones, Digital Book 2013, IDPF, BEA 2013One of the hardest elements of Amazon Publishing’s new Kindle Worlds program for some authors to grasp may inadvertently have been seeded in that last sentence from Seattle’s press release, Amazon Publishing Introduces “Kindle Worlds,” a New Publishing Model for Authors Inspired to Write Fan Fiction. “Self-service submission platform” does not mean self-publishing. It means no agent needed. Writers can submit their own fan fiction for consideration.

But Kindle Worlds material will be published by Amazon Publishing, not by authors themselves. Fan-fiction writers will be paid a royalty of up to 35 percent of net revenue. So will the original authors of licensed properties, though their royalty rate is not disclosed. By pre-licensing various popular targets of fan fiction—and paying writers on both ends of the process—Amazon has made what many are hailing as yet another run around the major publishers.

agent, author, books, digital, ebooks, Jane Friedman, Porter Anderson, publisher, publishing, Writing on the Ether, blog, blogging, journalism, Publishing Perspectives, Ether for Authors, Ed Nawotka, The Bookseller, FutureBook, Philip Jones, Digital Book 2013, IDPF, BEA 2013

Suw Charman-Anderson

In Amazon Legitimises Fanfic, Publishers Are Left Behind Again, Suw Charman-Anderson writes:

How many more business opportunities are Amazon going to create from things that the publishing industry has ignored or rejected? Publishers cannot allow themselves to be pushed constantly onto their back foot by Amazon, they can’t let outdated attitudes towards copyright, licensing and creativity define their future. They need to do what Amazon does only too well: Find under-served communities and then give them the tools to write, to create and to make money from their work. Dust by @HughHowey

And the sixth member of the Indies Bestsellers booth 966 team, Wool trilogy author Howey, has posted a welcoming article, Amazon Announces Kindle Worlds. Howey is working up to the August 17 release date of the third part of his Silo Saga trilogy, Dust, which follows the original Wool and Shift.

About Amazon’s Kindle Worlds, he writes:

If you ask me, this is a major game-changer. I’ve been a huge proponent of fan fiction ever since David Adams began dabbling in my world over a year ago. When other authors approached about the possibility of exploring the silos, I gave them full permission and even suggested they self-publish and charge for it. Even if it’s a buck, artists should be able to profit from their work. And yeah, I think fan fiction is work. It isn’t stealing any more than Shakespeare basing all of his plays on other plays or historical events was stealing.

agent, author, books, digital, ebooks, Jane Friedman, Porter Anderson, publisher, publishing, Writing on the Ether, blog, blogging, journalism, Publishing Perspectives, Ether for Authors, Ed Nawotka, The Bookseller, FutureBook, Philip Jones, Digital Book 2013, IDPF, BEA 2013

John Scalzi

Howey, like some others, is pointing to author John Scalzi’s admittedly early thoughts on the Amazon initiative, Amazon’s Kindle Worlds: Instant Thoughts. Careful to clarify that he’s speaking for himself, not as the outgoing president of the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America, Scalzi points to the plan’s requirement that published fan-fiction writers give up their rights to their fan fiction, and to the line: “We will also give the World Licensor a license to use your new elements and incorporate them into other works without further compensation to you.”

Howey, however, has a different take on this point. He writes that he sees it not as a way for original material writers to gain fan-fiction writers’ ideas but as protection for those original writers against charges of having filched those ideas from fans.

The biggest fear with fan fiction is that the person who owns the copyright will get sued because of a perceived similarity drawn from fan fiction. This clause nips that possibility in the bud. Rather than a clause that says: “You can’t sue the copyright holder,” they wrote a clause that says: “You can’t sue the copyright holder.” It’s a valid fear neatly dispensed with. Otherwise, I think Amazon would have a difficult time getting copyright holders to sign on.

Among other questions ricocheting around the industry! the industry! about the new program are fundamental ones about the nature of fan fiction, itself—does it exist as such, for example, if it’s not written and distributed as a gift to one’s community of fellow fans?

agent, author, books, digital, ebooks, Jane Friedman, Porter Anderson, publisher, publishing, Writing on the Ether, blog, blogging, journalism, Publishing Perspectives, Ether for Authors, Ed Nawotka, The Bookseller, FutureBook, Philip Jones, Digital Book 2013, IDPF, BEA 2013

Flourish Klink

In Kindle Worlds, one of the more evenly considered bits of writing on the matter, the colorfully named Flourish Klink writes of how, for writers who see fan fiction as a route to a career, “Kindle Worlds would seem like a godsend.” And she’s less concerned than some about  the new program’s guidelines (which rule out, for example, pornography). Instead, she writes:

I worry that some people in the entertainment industry are viewing Kindle Worlds as a way to “control” fans. This is a tale as old as time, or at least as old as when rightsholders really, really wanted the Harry Potter fandom to stop writing about Harry Potter being gay. (Yes, this was An Issue, long before Dumbledore came out of the closet. I swear to you, it was.) Can I blame them for wanting to control the stories they’ve told? Not entirely, no. I can’t blame that impulse, any more than I can blame the impulse of a novelist to yell at fanfiction writers for “messing up their world.” The novelist invested their heart and soul, Warner Brothers invested millions of dollars, in either case there are these weird outsiders coming in and making the stories about something else, something they never envisioned. What will happen? What if Harry Potter gets associated with gay porn? Then maybe audiences won’t want to see it anymore! And then what?

Nevertheless, Flourish writes:

There’s nothing wrong with Kindle Worlds as one possibility among many. It actually represents one good thing: the recognition that fans are doing work for franchises, work which can and maybe should be compensated. That’s a step that nobody has taken (outside of rare contests), to my knowledge.

https://twitter.com/franklinbi/status/337538777100726273

And, for his part, Howey wants to see the discussion be less about Amazon and more about this new development in terms of literature and work for writers. Conceding that he’s an unabashed and longtime fan of Amazon as an enabler of book careers, he writes about Kindle Worlds this way:

It seems to me that Amazon has witnessed the power of turning readers into writers with KDP. Now they’re looking to entice even more people into the fold. Again, if the literary world thinks the fight is amongst ourselves, we’re all doomed. Yesterday, Microsoft unveiled the latest XBox. Tomorrow, Facebook will probably change its layout in a way that both pisses us off and makes it more of a time-suck. Our competition is elsewhere, people. Driving readership and writership should be our number 1 concern. It’s my concern, has been since I was an avid reader in grade school. And I think it’s Amazon’s as well.

And, just a note of my own: it’s important for writers to check out Amazon Publishing’s Kindle Worlds author page for themselves. Go over the details carefully and be sure to fully understand how the program works. Don’t let the community or a BFF do your thinking for you. After all, sometimes what the fans pass around is, truly, fiction.  Back to Table of Contents

 

‘Bootstrapped a Publishing Company’

I bootstrapped a publishing company that’s sold over a million books, and I’m looking for publishing partners. I think BEA is the best place to meet people who can help me expand my business. Plus I want to see what other publishers are doing.

agent, author, books, digital, ebooks, Jane Friedman, Porter Anderson, publisher, publishing, Writing on the Ether, blog, blogging, journalism, Publishing Perspectives, Ether for Authors, Ed Nawotka, The Bookseller, FutureBook, Philip Jones, Digital Book 2013, IDPF, BEA 2013Returning to Howey’s Booth 966 associates at BEA: Bond is mincing no words about what she wants from the experience of making common cause with her colleagues. I asked her what she wants from the experience of the Indie Bestsellers booth. She answered with the kind of entrepreneurial energy that can make an old traditionalist blanch:

I hope to leave BEA with stronger relationships with my distributors and readers, and new relationships with forward-thinking marketers. And I absolutely see myself publishing other authors’ books someday in the near future.

agent, author, books, digital, ebooks, Jane Friedman, Porter Anderson, publisher, publishing, Writing on the Ether, blog, blogging, journalism, Publishing Perspectives, Ether for Authors, Ed Nawotka, The Bookseller, FutureBook, Philip Jones, Digital Book 2013, IDPF, BEA 2013Freethy says she’s glad to see ebook sellers enthusiastic about the Booth 966 initiative:

All the ebook retailers I spoke to were very excited to see a group of Indie authors establishing a presence at the show. In fact, Createspace graciously donated books for some of us to sign at our booth signing.

Lyons might be spending some time with the folks at the Library Journal booth near the Indie Bestsellers. She tells me:

I think it’s important for booksellers, librarians, and the media to realize what indie authors can accomplish, that there are more of us bestsellers than they realize (and we’re not going away!), and that we can work with them as well or better than traditional publishing companies.

Especially librarians. I love, love, love libraries and would absolutely adore it if the ALA [American Library Association] created their own version of an e-book publishing portal—allowing authors/publishers to upload files, set a price (even free!) and then libraries can pick and choose which books they want. I’m not sure why libraries are so set with going through middle men like Overdrive instead of creating their own platform and letting the publishers and authors come to them.

agent, author, books, digital, ebooks, Jane Friedman, Porter Anderson, publisher, publishing, Writing on the Ether, blog, blogging, journalism, Publishing Perspectives, Ether for Authors, Ed Nawotka, The Bookseller, FutureBook, Philip Jones, Digital Book 2013, IDPF, BEA 2013Andre mentions to me that she’s got three signings of her own—apart from Booth 966—coming up, “so there will be plenty of Bella Andre Sullivan book swag to go around because of that.”

• Harlequin booth, May 30, 11:30 am
• RWA booth, May 31, 10 am
• “Chute” signing, May 31, 3 pm

How tight, I ask, is this group of authors going forward?

Freethy:

We’re a loosely connected group, and we do things together when it works, but every author in the group is a powerhouse author on an individual basis, so everyone is very busy with their own endeavors as well.

agent, author, books, digital, ebooks, Jane Friedman, Porter Anderson, publisher, publishing, Writing on the Ether, blog, blogging, journalism, Publishing Perspectives, Ether for Authors, Ed Nawotka, The Bookseller, FutureBook, Philip Jones, Digital Book 2013, IDPF, BEA 2013Echoed by Folsom:

We’re really individuals and we like it that way. I suppose that’s one of the reasons we’ve gone out on our own. We like to be independent.

And ratified by Lyons, who, asked if the future holds more coordinated efforts, tells me:

Only if someone else could organize it. My gift is ideas (like getting this group together) but I stink at logistics, I’m not a good detail person.


So what do you think? Does this kind of collaborative effort among entrepreneurial authors in a trade-show setting make sense? Can eight million copies sold between our big six here stand out in the crazy-crowded floor at BEA? Would you partner up with other authors this way?

Back to Table of Contents


Main image: BEA 2013 | BookExpo America diagrams

 

Posted in Writing on the Ether and tagged , , , , , , .

Porter Anderson / @Porter_Anderson

Porter Anderson (@Porter_Anderson) is a journalist and consultant in publishing. He's The Bookseller's (London) Associate Editor in charge of The FutureBook. He's a featured writer with Thought Catalog (New York), which carries his reports, commentary, and frequent Music for Writers interviews with composers and musicians. And he's a regular contributor of "Provocations in Publishing" with Writer Unboxed. Through his consultancy, Porter Anderson Media, Porter covers, programs, and speaks at publishing conferences and other events in Europe and the US, and works with various players in publishing, such as Library Journal's SELF-e, Frankfurt Book Fair's Business Club, and authors. You can follow his editorial output at Porter Anderson Media, and via this RSS link.

Join the conversation

21 Comments on "WRITING ON THE ETHER: The Indies are Coming! to BEA"

Notify of
avatar
Sort by:   newest | oldest | most voted
Bob Mayer

I passed the one million eBooks sold earlier this year and will be representing Cool Gus along with Jen Talty at BEA. It’s a great opportunity for indie authors and publishers to make contacts with the distribution and discoverability platforms. Already we’re seeing our calendar filling up with meetings. It’s nice that many companies are open to meeting with indies, when this wasn’t really the case just a few years ago.

996 is a great idea and we’ll see more of this in the future.

Porter Anderson

@google-09a2be7b6f84fae4eec329151af4fc09:disqus
Hey, Bob,

Thanks for reading and commenting, and congratulations on passing the one-million mark! Good that you and Jen can be at BEA again this year, and that independents and self-publishers are finding a lot more uptake. Certainly Booth 966 will be one to watch, you’re right.

See you there, thanks again-

trackback

[…] For those of you who were following the whole Kindle Worlds thing yesterday, you should all go read this post by John Scalzi.  He’s sensible and highlights the initial “hey this isn’t a great idea for writers” aspects of things.  Also a nice flip side overview from Jane Friedman. […]

Lelaina Landis
RE: “Suw Charman-Anderson writes: ‘They [publishers] need to do what Amazon does only too well: Find under-served communities and then give them the tools to write, to create and to make money from their work.'” Although I don’t think that Kindle Worlds will run as smoothly as touted, I do applaud Amazon for its vision. I have no interest in reading fan fiction (what we’re really talking about are derivative works; to my mind “fanfic” has an entirely different flavor than a derivative), it’s obviously that this genre (?) appeals to a large enough demographic that makes it worth pursuing.… Read more »
Porter Anderson
@lelainalandis:disqus Hi, Lelaina, Thanks for reading the Ether and responding! I can agree with your feeling about fan fiction pretty easily, myself. I don’t find it interesting, either. I’m much more interested in original, unprecedented work. Nevertheless, like you, I recognize its popularity. I’d love to see some survey work done that might give us a look at how readily big followers of fan fiction pick up newly published work. I other words, does reading fanfic translate to a desire to read new, original material? Or does the supportive community that often surrounds fanfic help keep its readers in place… Read more »
trackback

[…] As fractured as the author community may be today, six self-publishing indie "stars" are taking a unified stand (No. 966) at BEA in New York City.  […]

Jim Hamlett

It was only a matter of time, Porter, before indie authors banded together. More of this is coming. Some of the craft will be good (I’ve read Hugh Howey’s stuff and enjoyed it.), and some will be as poor as what some of the regular publishing houses sell. But it’s all about the selling. Too bad that seems to be the only barometer of what’s “good.”

trackback

[…] Writ­ing on the Ether: The Indies Are Com­ing! […]

trackback

[…] as covered in last week’s Writing on the Ether, Howey and five other self-described Indie Bestsellers taking Booth 966 together at BEA—with more […]

Tasha Turner

I think it made a lot of sense for them to team up while at BEA. Just the sales numbers alone have to help in getting people to start taking indie authors more seriously. And one of the great things about the indie industry is we do band together to help each other out and talk about what new and innovative things we could be trying.

trackback

[…] In Writing on the Ether at JaneFriedman.com, I previewed these self-publishing and hybrid authors’ effort to take a booth together and see how it went. Having written up their intention, I kept an eye on them during the show in New York. They are Bella Andre, Stephanie Bond, Tina Folsom, Barbara Freethy, Hugh Howey, and CJ Lyons. By my count they have more than eight million books sold between them. Their standard talking figure is 10 million. (See, publishers? These authors can sling hype, too!) […]

trackback

[…] profile of “author” at BEA was seriously and healthily challenged by the cooperative Booth 966 mounted by six “Indie Bestsellers” of a combined eight million […]

trackback

[…] publishing world looks very much like the Wild, Wild West. See Porter Anderson’s report at Ether for Authors and a list of articles on the heated publishing discussions at Publishing Perspectives.  Put in […]

trackback

[…] There’s more about Freethy and her self-publishing colleagues here in Writing on the Ether: BEA Booth 966: The Indies Are Coming! […]

trackback

[…] earning capacity from author Bella Andre, a Freethy and Howey associate in the #Indie6 group of “Indie Bestsellers” who took a booth together at BookExpo America (BEA) this […]

trackback

[…] I wrote about this here in Writing on the Ether in The Indies Are Coming! to BEA. […]

trackback

[…] I wrote about this here in Writing on the Ether in The Indies Are Coming! to BEA. […]

trackback

[…] I wrote about this here in Writing on the Ether in The Indies Are Coming! to BEA. […]

trackback

[…] I wrote about this here in Writ­ing on the Ether in The Indies Are Com­ing! to BEA. […]

trackback

[…] some argue that, by not engaging more with fan fiction, publishers are clinging to an outdated view of copyright and that it would be more productive to find a way to engage with fans instead of fighting against […]

wpDiscuz