Libraries and self-publishers

Getting Self-Published Books Into Libraries

Accessing the library market remains difficult for self-publishing authors, especially those with limited visibility. Here’s what authors need to understand before spending time and energy on library distribution.

Eddie Wright

5 On: Eddie Wright

Eddie Wright discusses artistic collaboration, why he adapted his novella into a graphic novel, marketing straight fiction vs. marketing comics, and more.

Hannah Goodman

5 On: Hannah R. Goodman

Author and writing coach Hannah R. Goodman shares her experiences in self-publishing and marketing YA fiction.

do you love your publisher #authorsay

Do You Love Your Publisher: Author Survey Results

Last month, author Harry Bingham and I launched an author survey to explore the experiences and current leanings of traditionally published authors in the English language. The Bookseller in the UK originally reported on the survey here; it can catch you up on what we hoped to accomplish with this effort. So the results are now in. We received 812 responses; you can view […]

Robert Kroese

5 On: Robert Kroese

Robert Kroese reveals the process that allows him to write up to three books per year, and how authors can increase their sales potential.

What Authors Can Learn From Startups

You can find marketing inspiration in what others have done, but also know that the less advertised “strategies” might actually be the ones worth pursuing.

Indie Authors and the Question of Kindle Unlimited

Old post alert! This was published in 2014 and some aspects of Kindle Unlimited have changed. If you’re investigating whether KU is right for you, you’ll need to go further than reading this post. Recently, Amazon joined the e-book subscription playing field alongside Oyster and Scribd to offer subscribers unlimited access to more than 700,000 e-books […]

Digital Book World

What Should Authors & Publishers Expect in 2015?

In January, I’m moderating a panel at the Digital Book World Conference + Expo, which focuses on information and ideas about the digital publishing landscape. In advance, I’ve answered five questions about digital publishing to help attendees make the most out of the three-day event, and lay the groundwork for conversations that will take place at the conference and […]

Should Children’s Book Authors Self-Publish?

Note from Jane: Today’s guest post is by Sangeeta Mehta (@sangeeta_editor), a former acquiring editor of children’s books at Little, Brown and Simon & Schuster, who runs her own editorial services company. With all the changes taking place in the publishing industry, it seems harder than ever for even the best writers to secure a […]

Mike Cogh / via Flickr

The Long-Term View: 3 Exciting Mind Shifts for Author Entrepreneurs

Note from Jane: Today’s guest post is from Joanna Penn (@thecreativepenn), and is based on her new book, Business for Authors: How to Be an Author Entrepreneur, out now in ebook, print and audio. During the last five years, I have seen a major shift in the publishing arena because of emergent technology and a changing […]

Smart Set

Is Publishing in Trouble or Not—Decide! [Smart Set]

Welcome to The Smart Set, a weekly series where I curate a selection of articles from the past week related to the publishing/media industry that merit your attention. I also point to what I see as the most interesting underlying questions, and welcome you to respond or ask your own questions in the comments. “To seek: to embrace the questions, be […]

And If the Readership Pulls in Different Directions?

While lots of authors are fond of saying that readers don’t care whether something is traditionally published or self-published, many of them also want to tell you there’s this marching army of indie-only reading author. So which is it going to be?—they’ll read anything? or they’ll read only free-range indie books?

Another Leap of Hybrid Faith: New Publishing Routes

Shanna Swendson, author of the Enchanted Inc. series of books, is working what some authors might consider near-magic in a transition from traditional publishing to self-publishing. And she’s getting savvier about it fast.

Writer Unboxed

Serial Fiction: How It’s Changing Publishing

My latest column at Writer Unboxed tackles serial fiction—and how it’s changing writing, reading, and publishing. Here’s a little snippet: Both serials and fan fiction have been around a long time (since Dickens, remember?). If these forms are being reinvented and rediscovered because mobile- and tablet-based reading is growing, this may mean the strategic author […]

Earning the Authors a Say

Much shorter and quicker to go over than the initial report, this edition takes into account information interpreted from approximately 11,000 titles in genre fiction; 900 in literary fiction; 30,000 in non-fiction; and some 10,000 in children’s (not YA) fiction. Hugh Howey has, since the first report, adopted a more frequent use of the term “spider” for the software his still-unnamed associate is deploying.

Howey’s Convention: “Organized Advocacy”

You may be looking at the best chance ever encountered for authors—of all stripes, Ms. Rowling, as Hugh Howey tells us—to at last come together, to make common cause, and to speak as one with a force this industry has never known.

A Call for Writers to Organize: Hugh Howey Interview

Table of Contents “To Call for Change Within the Publishing Community” “To Stand Up for Each Other” “A New Era of Openness” “I Didn’t Have a Social Life Before” “To Call for Change Within the Publishing Community” This is how a movement might start: Indie authors are outselling the Big Five. That’s the entire Big […]

Publishing, Between Revolution and Revolt: Writing on the Ether

Table of Contents Lit Smart Rebecca Hugh and Cry Combat in the Community If You See Us Running… Lit Follow that burning fuse. It runs between these two curiously different words. We may need to think about which of them is closer to us. Revolution. Pretty comfortable. Thanks to Madison Avenue, we nowadays say “revolution” for […]

Is the “Publishers’ Monopoly” Broken? Writing on the Ether

Table of Contents Read It and Tweet No Anti-Social Scientists, Please “A Two-for-One Special” Our “Bifurcating Future” Read It and Tweet A funny thing happened to me on Twitter this week. I “crafted a tweet.” (Sounds so “artisanal” that way, no?) This was the kind of tweet in which I like to mention a new […]

by ChaoticMind 75 / Flickr

6 Ways Micro-Publishing Strengthens Your Author Career

Micro-published books are short, tight, and swift. A meaningful discussion of micro-publishing has been pushed aside during the ongoing tug-of-war between traditional publishing and independent publishing (self-publishing). But we are well beyond “everyone is a writer” at this point. We have progressed into “everyone is a publisher,” if they wish to be—and we have been living in this realm for some time already. Fortunately, micro-publishing benefits the industry as a whole by bringing some much-needed simplicity and directness into a publishing equation that is often weighted down by its own complexity and contracts. And it also benefits you, the writer.

Writing on the Ether: When the Wise Women Get Here

Table of Contents They Three Queens of Orient Were Hope and Fear #1: Visibility Hope and Fear #2: Literary Fiction Hope and Fear #3: Rest They Three Queens of Orient Were If they’d been guys, they’d never have made it to the Nativity. Once the OnStar of David navigation system got behind a few clouds […]

Writing on the Ether: Where Publishing Surveys Cannot Go

If we want to count all the self-publishing authors, then we need to survey and count every hapless no-income-from-writing would-be traditionally published author who gets nowhere and ends up at the bar next to me discussing the superb color that Milan puts into Campari.

Our surveys are counting the self-publishing losers.
Our surveys are counting only traditional publishers’ winners.

Writing on the Ether: Kobo’s Feast of Burden

Michael Tamblyn of Kobo was The FutureBook’s Most Inspiring Digital Dude of the Day and, I’m sure, of many days to come. In a finely arranged conference full of important and edifying detail and personality, Tamblyn seized that room’s collective intelligence with gratifying honesty, pink lightning on a bare stage.